hyper island

NUX Camp: Service Design Explained

Yesterday I spent the afternoon at NUX Camp in Leeds. I guided 30 people through a basic service design process in less than 3 hours. This session was designed to give the participants a rapid light touch experience of the design process and get a sense of how service design principles are applied at every stage. 19060593042_604a3c0a34_z

Each team created a "How Might We" statements...

  1. How might we improve the train experience?
  2. How might we make it easier to get a doctors appointment?
  3. How might we make sending a parcel easier?
  4. How might we improve the experience of going to your GP?
  5. How might we improve the online banking experience?

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We then journey mapped, mapped emotions, created personas, talked to the public about our ideas, storyboarded and prototyped.  We used some energisers and we checked in and out ( to find out more about these Hyper Island methodologies you can visit our open source tool box )

 

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Some of the final ideas included online banking authenticated by drones, oyster card for trains, uber for doctor and a dropbox for physical parcels.

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The teams quickly jumped online to get immediate feedback on their ideas and despite the rain some teams ventured outside. Excellent.

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Thank you to the team at NUX Camp for having me and thank you to all of you who turned up and gave it your all. Thanks to Steven Kelly for the ace pics and thanks to Sia for being such a helping hand. I've captured some lovely feedback in this storify.

For those of you who are hungry for more:

  • DeSID report : A much needed recent report Design for Service Innovation & Development (DeSID) takes a rigorous look at service design through six case studies.
  • Hyper Island tool box is here
  • More on why we use rubber chickens
  • Find out more about the MA in Experience Design I run
  • We will be launching a Master Class in Service Design in October so sign up for our newsletter so you don't miss out
  • You can follow the work of Snook up in Scotland over here
  • I recommend following the Design Economy series by The Design Council

#16 The UX Designer

I'm delighted to welcome Clive Lavery to Hyper Island tomorrow. Clive and I first met online when I was beginning to shape the programme and it's been great to hear his ideas throughout the process. His twitter feed is a constant source of inspiration and goodness. He is going to spend time with the students supporting them to understand the ethical issues at play in the field of Experience Design.

Here's what he has to say....

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?

Not restricted to the last 12 months but what has built up over the years is me thinking time and time again: “job titles mean nothing - please just show me your work.”  Particularly in the agency world people love to make up fancy titles that might sound impressive to co-workers and headhunters but (deliberately?) confusing to customers or the man in the street.

I have had business cards reading “Concept Developer”, “Information Architect”, “Interaction Architect”, “Consultant” or the German equivalent of “UX Designer” aka “Konzepter” and essentially have been doing very similar things all the time.

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 14.42.16
I just like to call myself a “UX Person” now since recently going freelance - if this doesn’t work there's always the very useful UX Job Title Generator which turned me into a  “Principal Mobile User Experience Unicorn” at the click of a button.
2.What’s your burning question of the moment?

Apart from how UXers and the likes can use their skills to do something more meaningful than just making rich companies richer, I think an awful lot about the so-called “Digital Nomad” lifestyle and if it would be the right thing for me.

While "Digital Nomad" in itself might perhaps be just one of those fancy titles that I claimed to despise in question number 1, the concept of making a location independent living just sounds so tempting. Not least since travel is, next to food and records, the one thing I spend most of my money on anyway.
On the other hand I love living in Berlin and wonder if my ambitions could just turn out to be  escapism that won’t make me any happier in the long run.

3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year?
While researching different takes on company culture within digital agencies I came across Big Spaceship’s manual for new employees.
Section 1 starts with “ We act like humans, we talk like humans, and we think like humans. And we call out anyone who does the opposite.” - they had me hooked straight away and crafted a manual that included so many things I have had in my head on the topic for so long. Read it here and ask for nothing less at your next job interview: http://de.slideshare.net/bigspaceship/big-spaceship-ourmanual

#16 The UX Designer

I'm delighted to welcome Clive Lavery to Hyper Island tomorrow. Clive and I first met online when I was beginning to shape the programme and it's been great to hear his ideas throughout the process. His twitter feed is a constant source of inspiration and goodness. He is going to spend time with the students supporting them to understand the ethical issues at play in the field of Experience Design.

Here's what he has to say....

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?

Not restricted to the last 12 months but what has built up over the years is me thinking time and time again: “job titles mean nothing - please just show me your work.”  Particularly in the agency world people love to make up fancy titles that might sound impressive to co-workers and headhunters but (deliberately?) confusing to customers or the man in the street.

I have had business cards reading “Concept Developer”, “Information Architect”, “Interaction Architect”, “Consultant” or the German equivalent of “UX Designer” aka “Konzepter” and essentially have been doing very similar things all the time.

Screen Shot 2015-05-26 at 14.42.16
I just like to call myself a “UX Person” now since recently going freelance - if this doesn’t work there's always the very useful UX Job Title Generator which turned me into a  “Principal Mobile User Experience Unicorn” at the click of a button.
2.What’s your burning question of the moment?

Apart from how UXers and the likes can use their skills to do something more meaningful than just making rich companies richer, I think an awful lot about the so-called “Digital Nomad” lifestyle and if it would be the right thing for me.

While "Digital Nomad" in itself might perhaps be just one of those fancy titles that I claimed to despise in question number 1, the concept of making a location independent living just sounds so tempting. Not least since travel is, next to food and records, the one thing I spend most of my money on anyway.
On the other hand I love living in Berlin and wonder if my ambitions could just turn out to be  escapism that won’t make me any happier in the long run.

3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year?
While researching different takes on company culture within digital agencies I came across Big Spaceship’s manual for new employees.
Section 1 starts with “ We act like humans, we talk like humans, and we think like humans. And we call out anyone who does the opposite.” - they had me hooked straight away and crafted a manual that included so many things I have had in my head on the topic for so long. Read it here and ask for nothing less at your next job interview: http://de.slideshare.net/bigspaceship/big-spaceship-ourmanual

#14 The Experience Designer

Joe Macleod has been working in the mobile design space since 1998 and was recently listed in The Drum's Designerati Top 100 Designers. At Nokia he helped develop some of the most streamlined packaging in the world, he created a hack team to disrupt the corporate drone of powerpoint, produced mobile services for pregnant women in Africa and pioneered lighting behaviour for millions of phones. For the last four years he has been key to establishing ustwo as the UKs best digital product studio, with 180 people globally in London, New York and Sweden, while also successfully building education initiatives, curriculums and courses on the back of the IncludeDesign campaign which launched in 2013. Joe was involved in the initial conversations and workshops with Hyper Island when the proposal for a Digital Experience Design MA started to take shape. I've really valued my conversations with him on what this programme hsould be and how it is for and can't wait to work with him next month.

I'm delighted Joe is going to be working with the students as part of their Experience Design Exploration Project.  Here's what he has to say...

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?

Bringing groups together can add value beyond the sum of parts of those groups. For example, groups I talk to about design education have similar approaches and rolls. I noticed this after talking to the Design Council, D&AD, and Tech City at different periods over the last year. All had similar needs and ambitions, yet they rarely talk to one another. So I put together a small summit for them to come together and share strategy with a view to helping each other for the common good. It was very successful with lots of common ground where they could help one another. They now have an open dialogue and a regular meetings.

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2. What’s your burning question of the moment? Defining and developing Closure Experiences so we can improve our consumer relationships and increase responsibility. The questions surrounding this issue are fairly numerous effecting all aspects of our western lives, but I am slowly chipping away at them as the months pass with the research.

3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year? Most certainly the Heat book by George Monbiot. Its the scariest thing I have read in years. Climate change is bigger than any war and there is so much miss-information about it. The author cuts through swathes of this to get to tangible, realistic goals that are archivable in slowing climate change to within the 2 degree target set by the IPCC.

4. What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island's new MA in Digital Experience Design? Take life seriously, take risk happily, and don’t believe designers have all the answers.

#14 The Experience Designer

Joe Macleod has been working in the mobile design space since 1998 and was recently listed in The Drum's Designerati Top 100 Designers. At Nokia he helped develop some of the most streamlined packaging in the world, he created a hack team to disrupt the corporate drone of powerpoint, produced mobile services for pregnant women in Africa and pioneered lighting behaviour for millions of phones. For the last four years he has been key to establishing ustwo as the UKs best digital product studio, with 180 people globally in London, New York and Sweden, while also successfully building education initiatives, curriculums and courses on the back of the IncludeDesign campaign which launched in 2013. Joe was involved in the initial conversations and workshops with Hyper Island when the proposal for a Digital Experience Design MA started to take shape. I've really valued my conversations with him on what this programme hsould be and how it is for and can't wait to work with him next month.

I'm delighted Joe is going to be working with the students as part of their Experience Design Exploration Project.  Here's what he has to say...

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?

Bringing groups together can add value beyond the sum of parts of those groups. For example, groups I talk to about design education have similar approaches and rolls. I noticed this after talking to the Design Council, D&AD, and Tech City at different periods over the last year. All had similar needs and ambitions, yet they rarely talk to one another. So I put together a small summit for them to come together and share strategy with a view to helping each other for the common good. It was very successful with lots of common ground where they could help one another. They now have an open dialogue and a regular meetings.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 14.48.08

2. What’s your burning question of the moment? Defining and developing Closure Experiences so we can improve our consumer relationships and increase responsibility. The questions surrounding this issue are fairly numerous effecting all aspects of our western lives, but I am slowly chipping away at them as the months pass with the research.

3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year? Most certainly the Heat book by George Monbiot. Its the scariest thing I have read in years. Climate change is bigger than any war and there is so much miss-information about it. The author cuts through swathes of this to get to tangible, realistic goals that are archivable in slowing climate change to within the 2 degree target set by the IPCC.

4. What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island's new MA in Digital Experience Design? Take life seriously, take risk happily, and don’t believe designers have all the answers.