user experience

#8 The Business Designer

Martin Charlier is a designer specialising in UX, business strategy and service design. He’s the co-founder of RainCloud and has previously worked at Random International, Frog, Fjord and Accenture. He's writing a book about user experience and the Internet Of Things. I'm thrilled that Martin is going to work with the new Digital Experience Design students during their Business Strategy Module.

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?
A simple, achievable idea that might be boring to you as a designer can have a much bigger impact on your client’s business than a grand, creative one that you find interesting but that the client can’t realise.

2. What’s your burning question of the moment?
There are so many burning questions! Is there a future for design consultancies doing more than mere execution? If yes, what’s the model? Is the world of connected products and the Internet of Things going to catch on or is it just a fad? With this ‘hardware revolution’ approaching, how do we build physical products in a sustainable and circular way so we’re not just adding to landfill?
Screen Shot 2015-02-22 at 15.31.53
3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year?
Rory Sutherland’s lecture ‘The third eye’. It left me thinking that every designer has to know their way around the intersection of behavioural psychology and economics that Sutherland talks about so eloquently.

4. What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island's new MA in Digital Experience Design?
Ideas are the easy bit! Place your focus on learning and improving how you explain, structure and underpin them so that businesses understand them, see their business value, and can realistically achieve and implement them.

#8 The Business Designer

Martin Charlier is a designer specialising in UX, business strategy and service design. He’s the co-founder of RainCloud and has previously worked at Random International, Frog, Fjord and Accenture. He's writing a book about user experience and the Internet Of Things. I'm thrilled that Martin is going to work with the new Digital Experience Design students during their Business Strategy Module.

1. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year?
A simple, achievable idea that might be boring to you as a designer can have a much bigger impact on your client’s business than a grand, creative one that you find interesting but that the client can’t realise.

2. What’s your burning question of the moment?
There are so many burning questions! Is there a future for design consultancies doing more than mere execution? If yes, what’s the model? Is the world of connected products and the Internet of Things going to catch on or is it just a fad? With this ‘hardware revolution’ approaching, how do we build physical products in a sustainable and circular way so we’re not just adding to landfill?
Screen Shot 2015-02-22 at 15.31.53
3. What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year?
Rory Sutherland’s lecture ‘The third eye’. It left me thinking that every designer has to know their way around the intersection of behavioural psychology and economics that Sutherland talks about so eloquently.

4. What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island's new MA in Digital Experience Design?
Ideas are the easy bit! Place your focus on learning and improving how you explain, structure and underpin them so that businesses understand them, see their business value, and can realistically achieve and implement them.

Designers: Guilty By Association

I'm delighted to be speaking at Talk UX.

"Talk UX is a UX conference unlike any other. We aim to create an open space to meet, learn and collaborate within UX. We want to change the way conferences are run and held, with a more personal experience. Over the course of the day we will examine the different areas that make up a UX role, from research to data schema we want to highlight the breadth of knowledge in our area, and the fantastic work that is being done."

These awesome women have been busy organising the event for March 5th at Manchester's Town Hall.

"We are putting you at the heart of everything that we do on the day, and we want to make sure that you don't miss out.

Tickets are an absolute steal at only £40- considering the speakers, food and goodies it is amazing value for money.

We have leading speakers from across the UK and further afield, and we promise that these are not talks (or topics) you will have heard before. We will be discussing privacy, designing for children and education to name a few.

There will also be interactive stalls for you to play with during the day, including a couple of Oculus head sets. Haven't had a chance to try one out yet? Now is your opportunity!"

Talk UX

My talk is called Designers: Guilty By Association:

"We are known for our stylistic gestures and whimsical, indulgent ideas, often created whilst wearing black polo necks. Taxi drivers think I design shoes for living. Most designers do. They design apps to help up find pizza faster and design sexy products that help us wake up on time.

We deserve better.

I’m one of many designers who are trying to reformulate the role design can play in the world. Using the design process to tackle many of the complex and serious problems facing our society. Some call it social design, service design or design activism. BUT the labels don’t matter. What does matter is the HOW.

How does this kind of design actually work and what does this mean for our future? Judging by the speed and enthusiasm with which design students are signing up for newly created courses on experience design, social and humanitarian design, more design activists and provocateurs will emerge in the future. It’s time to get responsible."

Grab your ticket here and follow the conversation online !

Designers: Guilty By Association

I'm delighted to be speaking at Talk UX.

"Talk UX is a UX conference unlike any other. We aim to create an open space to meet, learn and collaborate within UX. We want to change the way conferences are run and held, with a more personal experience. Over the course of the day we will examine the different areas that make up a UX role, from research to data schema we want to highlight the breadth of knowledge in our area, and the fantastic work that is being done."

These awesome women have been busy organising the event for March 5th at Manchester's Town Hall.

"We are putting you at the heart of everything that we do on the day, and we want to make sure that you don't miss out.

Tickets are an absolute steal at only £40- considering the speakers, food and goodies it is amazing value for money.

We have leading speakers from across the UK and further afield, and we promise that these are not talks (or topics) you will have heard before. We will be discussing privacy, designing for children and education to name a few.

There will also be interactive stalls for you to play with during the day, including a couple of Oculus head sets. Haven't had a chance to try one out yet? Now is your opportunity!"

Talk UX

My talk is called Designers: Guilty By Association:

"We are known for our stylistic gestures and whimsical, indulgent ideas, often created whilst wearing black polo necks. Taxi drivers think I design shoes for living. Most designers do. They design apps to help up find pizza faster and design sexy products that help us wake up on time.

We deserve better.

I’m one of many designers who are trying to reformulate the role design can play in the world. Using the design process to tackle many of the complex and serious problems facing our society. Some call it social design, service design or design activism. BUT the labels don’t matter. What does matter is the HOW.

How does this kind of design actually work and what does this mean for our future? Judging by the speed and enthusiasm with which design students are signing up for newly created courses on experience design, social and humanitarian design, more design activists and provocateurs will emerge in the future. It’s time to get responsible."

Grab your ticket here and follow the conversation online !

Personal Travel

This story written by Samantha Frietas, tells her story of travelling on a over-crowded bus every day in an unfamiliar country. Such honest and genuine accounts of such experiences are often hard to find... "I sometimes take myself out of the overwhelming and usually exhausting situation and find it very surreal. Like a scene out of a movie, there are people coughing, babies crying and people shouting on their cell phones - it seems like total chaos, yet if you look around at the passengers they are not even phased. The bus ride for them is not a frustrating invasion of space as it is for me, rather it is a time out of their day in which they have to worry about nothing but getting off at the right stop."

After reading this story, I would like to sum up my journeys in and around Amsterdam, the Harbour and my journey to the DSV factory tomorrow...

"The journey not the arrival matters." by T. S. Eliot