method

#10 The Hyper Island Designer

Meet Jesper Bröring. Jesper is a designer at Method and is an alumni of Hyper Island Manchester. I'm delighted to announce Jesper is the Industry Leader for our Experience Design Exploration Project. Here's what he has to say... What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year? Last year Method needed an interaction designer on a project in the New York studio. And I said that I’d love to go there for a while and so there I was on the plane from London to New York. I had never been and on the first day when I was walking to the office, I felt like I was walking to a new job. This obviously wasn’t the case, because I was just going to the NY office of Method and I had also already met a couple of my colleagues there before in London.

My biggest learning came from working with the team there. The ways of working in the offices are slightly different but on the project team we collaborated and changed the process where needed. The direct team was close to each other and we built up some great momentum and a great culture in a short amount of time. We all worked towards the same goal and I think that is where great work comes from.

Jesper_Method_Digital_Experience_Design

What’s your burning question of the moment? That would probably something like: What is the right balance of in-house and agency design teams? Sometimes I find it hard to be a partner because I think design is such an important thing within companies right now. If you look at the most successful companies at this moment then you will see that a lot of those are design led. Hence the question, what is the right balance?

What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year? The podcast called StartUp by Gimlet Media. I am absolutely in love with it. It’s a podcast that you should start from episode 1 because it is a story of the creation of a company.

Alex Blumberg, who is the CEO of this company, is a great storyteller and on top of that in the podcast he is very open and assumes you don’t know anything. He sometimes doesn’t either. The podcast is very honest and has some great parts in it. It’s great to see how Alex works around problems and that is exactly why I find it inspiring.

What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island’s new MA in Digital Experience Design? I actually think students at Hyper Island don’t need a lot of advice so I’ll give very practical advice. As an Hyper Island Manchester alumni, I would say try to live with a couple of other students. And also preferably nearby other students. This is because the other students are in the same boat, on the same journey. They haven’t done Hyper Island before, might have moved countries and probably don’t know anyone else in Manchester. It sounds cheesy, but during Hyper Island you’ll create some new great friendships that will last a lifetime. And to add to this, I think that the power of Hyper Island is that you learn the most from each other. So living together or nearby is a great start of that.

#10 The Hyper Island Designer

Meet Jesper Bröring. Jesper is a designer at Method and is an alumni of Hyper Island Manchester. I'm delighted to announce Jesper is the Industry Leader for our Experience Design Exploration Project. Here's what he has to say... What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learnt over the last year? Last year Method needed an interaction designer on a project in the New York studio. And I said that I’d love to go there for a while and so there I was on the plane from London to New York. I had never been and on the first day when I was walking to the office, I felt like I was walking to a new job. This obviously wasn’t the case, because I was just going to the NY office of Method and I had also already met a couple of my colleagues there before in London.

My biggest learning came from working with the team there. The ways of working in the offices are slightly different but on the project team we collaborated and changed the process where needed. The direct team was close to each other and we built up some great momentum and a great culture in a short amount of time. We all worked towards the same goal and I think that is where great work comes from.

Jesper_Method_Digital_Experience_Design

What’s your burning question of the moment? That would probably something like: What is the right balance of in-house and agency design teams? Sometimes I find it hard to be a partner because I think design is such an important thing within companies right now. If you look at the most successful companies at this moment then you will see that a lot of those are design led. Hence the question, what is the right balance?

What’s the most inspiring thing you’ve seen/ heard/ read in the last year? The podcast called StartUp by Gimlet Media. I am absolutely in love with it. It’s a podcast that you should start from episode 1 because it is a story of the creation of a company.

Alex Blumberg, who is the CEO of this company, is a great storyteller and on top of that in the podcast he is very open and assumes you don’t know anything. He sometimes doesn’t either. The podcast is very honest and has some great parts in it. It’s great to see how Alex works around problems and that is exactly why I find it inspiring.

What would be your one piece of advice to students on Hyper Island’s new MA in Digital Experience Design? I actually think students at Hyper Island don’t need a lot of advice so I’ll give very practical advice. As an Hyper Island Manchester alumni, I would say try to live with a couple of other students. And also preferably nearby other students. This is because the other students are in the same boat, on the same journey. They haven’t done Hyper Island before, might have moved countries and probably don’t know anyone else in Manchester. It sounds cheesy, but during Hyper Island you’ll create some new great friendships that will last a lifetime. And to add to this, I think that the power of Hyper Island is that you learn the most from each other. So living together or nearby is a great start of that.

Being a Service Architect

Over the past few weeks, I have been working on blueprinting my service solution for my Masters. So far, I have developed five distinct concepts for visual representation:

  • Rooms of Knowledge
  • Service Stairway
  • Painting on the wall
  • Illustration of machinery
  • 2D.3D.4D dynamic dimensions

In summary, I am developing a service for design students and graduates that offers them an accessible pathway into the service design industry.

The models all have different levels of representation and detail, each illustrating how my understanding of what a 'service blueprint' has to be, and during the process the potential of what it could be (visually) has evolved.

ROOMS OF KNOWLEDGE

Working with the metaphor that 'service design' is a building, I developed one 'service design floor' - and mapped user journeys through this environment. The 'Rooms of Knowledge' are static - the 'experience' becomes tactile. This visual method asks questions such as; How does each room support learning? What are the props needed to support learning?

Redjotter Lauren Currie Service Design

So, which service design floor are you on? Is your current understanding peripheral or deep? What floor do you want to go to? Do you want to fast track between floors, or systematically go into every room? Serendipity causes people to enter the 'Rooms of Knowledge' by chance, whilst the physical rooms have different experiences.

SERVICE DESIGN STAIRWAY

Redjotter Lauren Currie Service Design

PAINTING ON THE WALL

Thinking big and playing with colourful paints enabled me to feel less cautious of the content and more focused on the route that users take through the service: Scribbling is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go.”

Redjotter Lauren Currie Service Design

SERVICE AS A MACHINE

Looking at the movement of machines and the components that make up their function, I took visual inspiration from a postcard design from NESTA's Starter for 6 initiative. Drawing the service in this way has enabled me to think about how each 'stage' of the service impacts on the next stage in the process - every aspect a cog in a system.

Redjotter Lauren Currie Service Design

2D 3D 4D DIMENSIONS

Conceptually considering 2D as learnings, 3D as the landscape and 4D as the dynamic network, I am thinking dimensionally and treating the experience like a 3 dimensional shape. This is helps me think about the channels and routes into, through and out of the service, and view the experience holistically.

Redjotter Lauren Currie Service Design

I am aiming to incorporate backstage / physical touchpoints and user experiences into my final service design blueprint. So now a week of ultimate play lies ahead, as I turn the 'editor' down low and become an 'architect'. I am putting my pen and paper away (!!) with an aim to be very spatial. My study adviser believes I am on my way to developing "an iconic new way of representing a service". Very high hopes... I best get on with it!

Das Ende

The question of when a project formally ends is one that I usually take for granted. But this project has been different - our client was real, the budget was concrete and it all felt true. 3643089169_114e9d34fb

Berlin felt like a whole new place in the sunshine...

I have learned a whole new way of designing that was really challenging, but ultimately very liberating. It challenged the process I have been taught  since high school . We didn't find a problem - we didn't evaluate concepts - we let all ideas and possibilities collide. At times this felt too random, too unstructured - but the vast amount of ideas generated in such a short space of time was nothing like I had experienced before.

DSC00057

RIP and MIX places the focus on the process of existing design knowledge, objectified in the form of existing products and services. I have a new found respect for that knowledge.