master of design

Master in Service Design 2011 Competition

The Domus Academy have launched a service design competition to win a scholarship for their new Masters Course In Service Design.

The new master in Service Design is devoted to create the next generation of humanized and pleasurable service experiences. The design-driven approach to Service Design and management and the human-centric view are the driving forces for the innovation of service industries.

So you can enter this competition and send your service idea proposal to get a scholarship!

Volcanic Ash Cloud Shuts Airports:

The inconvenience generated by unpredictable events can become an occasion for companies to offer service plus.

Due to the ash cloud, in the last months, most people experienced canceled flights and flight's delay during their traveling time, with all the related soft or serious damages : waiting at the airport for hours or days, being forced to stay longer in a city-hotel, getting fresh clothes, feeling anxiety in flying close to the ash cloud, loosing important family or business events, queuing to find alternative travel arrangements and get information on next flights or trains, working in any place without your own stuff.

Consider one of these possibilities inconvenient situations to design a service idea that companies such as Airports, Airlines, Hotels, Travel Agencies, or even Telecoms could offer to their clients to alleviate the problems encountered. Often simple ideas and signals of courtesy become distinctive and value for customers.

The deadline is the 6th September...do you want to study Service Design in Italy? I think this is a great opportunity - and what do you have to lose? if you don't win you have still answered a very relevant brief! Let me know if you are going to enter ...

Studio Unbound V

This week I traveled to Dundee to present Studio Unbound to the Masters of Design students,  as well as some Design Ethnography Master students. This is my  fifth Studio Unbound session and this time I invited James Porteous to join me via skype. James is a designer from Glasgow school of Art, studying on the Product Design course, with interests ranging from traditional areas of the subject, through to aspects such as service and interaction design. Outside of this, he works as a photographer, covering sports, news, music for various publications and clients, both online and off. James was in the audience at Studio Unbound II - shortly after attending , he wrote:

"So, I guess you could say I was skeptical of what I was going to learn (Sorry!), but the whole thing was very convincing. The depth of their arguments was engaging, and the discussion after the talk was as useful as the presentation itself. Looking at the numbers of people from the evening who are now embarking on blogging and micro-blogging, it’s plain to see that the event hit the mark."

He now twitters, keeps a blog and has an individual project blog. Sarah and me have been watching from afar and it is so brilliant to see that James has interpreted our talk in his own way and is clearly getting something out of it! In one project blog alone he has written over 10,ooo words which he admits would not have happened if it had not been for his digital platform.

James was brilliant and provided yet another perspective to what the Studio Unbound can achieve. The audience asked some great questions like "Do you have methods for this stuff?". Well, at the moment we have methods set up to run one to one Studio Unbound sessions with students to prepare them in lots of different ways for embracing the digital world. Our next step will be developing tools to capture what we do and evidence to prove it works.

A conclusion that came of out of the discussion was "Never tell anyone you are a student unless you are asked." Yes - you study ethnography but you are still an ethnographer. One student remarked "This can clearly lead to brain overload" and of course she was right! James rightly put it saying "There is so much to be said for switching off "...

Keep up with the Studio Unbound conversation and welcome new comers here.

THE END OF DESIGN

The End of Design was the public lecture accompanying my recent Masters Exhibition. [slideshare id=2131578&doc=theendofdesign-091005111752-phpapp01]

"Modern design has run its course. The challenges of our age demands a new design; in place of designing for desire we should design for inclusion, understanding and real world problem solving. The power of design thinking presents us with new opportunities for the future.

As Scotland's top rated institution for research design, the University of Dundee is uniquely placed to set out a new vision for the future of design. In this special lecture, Professors Tom Inns and Mike Press - both internationally acknowledged writers, researchers and broadcasters on design - provide a provocative and visionary of design in the 21st Century.

Evidence of this new design is seen in the work of this year's graduating Masters of Design students. The lecture accompanies their masters exhibition, providing vital contexts and insights into their work. Together, the lecture and exhibition emphasise Dundee's unique approach to the research and practice of design. "

Lasting around an hour this video is a deep insight into The Master of Design Course at Dundee and the work at our Masters exhibition. It is definitely one to watch for the students who have gotten in touch with me as they are considering applying for the course - and other Masters students who are embarking upon a design journey.

It should not be missed - design against crime | service design | co design | social design | transformation design | product design | interaction design | design for well being | design for disability | design thinking | design management | interdisciplinary...the list goes on....

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more about "THE END OF DESIGN on Vimeo", posted with vodpod

Tom, who was my project mentor, recently shared his archipelago of design at a workshop in London. Lauren Tan documented the day really well, in particular her insights from Toms model.

Bring on the recession

I would like to introduce Redjotter's  first ever guest blogger: David Hicks founder of Glasgow based consultancy CrossingTheBorder that specialises in developing services, visual communication and customer engagement.David shares his opinion on the T-Labs project I worked on during my MDes program... MSS_show3

Recessions stink, they really do and ours isn’t over yet by a long shot. We may be having a bit of respite at the moment but the experts predict that this initial growth of the UK economy will only be temporary. In all likelihood, there will be a further contraction followed by a further ‘false dawn’ before sustained growth finally kicks in.

This ‘W’-curve recovery pattern means we are in a strange period of economic stagnation. But ‘Never waste a good crisis’ are words being uttered by many in business. An initial opportunity, not least a critical one is that your business audience is in a receptive state, whether they are in the public or private sector, with regard to learning how things can be done differently, at minimal costs of course.

Another mantra we are starting to hear is ‘Do more, with less’. Not ‘Do the same as you were doing, with a bit less’ but do a lot more with a lot less’. This is increasingly true for public sector organisations as the reality of looming budget cuts starts to be realised.

It was with these thoughts rattling about my consulting brain that I visited the Dundee University Masters Degree Show last week. In particular, I was interested in a project, which was a collaborative undertaking between a number of the Mdes (Master of Design) students and with a real client. It was clear on arriving at the show, and glancing at the large format visuals this was no ordinary academic undertaking.

The students, through the ‘design school’ had been commissioned by a well-known global mobile company to look at how their services could be developed for an aging and increasingly elderly population. The client provided a framework, which could generically be described as a design thinking process, however the remaining architecture of the client solution was developed by the students themselves, no mean feat given the client had to buy the structure before any further work could be completed.

The client engagement methodology was titled Rip + Mix by the students, one that alluded to the deconstruct/reconstruct nature of the approach they intended to take through the design process. Within this process, the students developed their own creative tools and workshop formats that would allow them to answer the service design brief both thoroughly and commercially. It was clear from the presentation that they had done this with the highest standards of thinking, creativity and professionalism.

Not least, they had taken the opportunity to first reformulate the clients’ questions, prioritise them and double-check them with the client, (how many agencies, consultants and economic support organisations could do with a refresher in that part of the process alone?) and they also eschewed, I was glad to see the default ‘customer-centred design’ process most designers seem to think is the be all/end all first

Within the project, each student had identified their own strengths and interests and identified where they fitted with each stage whilst contributing in a truly collaborative way – designers egos seemed to be conspicuous by their absence, meaning the client needs were always coming first.

Although I can’t go into the detail of the project for IP protection reasons, the students, or former students as they now are, showed a remarkable capacity to understand the client. By taking sufficient risks in coming up with both innovative yet practical solutions and importantly grasping the opportunity that there was space to both educate and up-skill the client in the process, an additional set of value creating deliverables had been included in the project.

Now, these are the people I want to work with, no matter where we are on the W-curve.

the end of design

Tomorrow night at 6pm, an exciting lecture by Professors Tom Inns and Mike Press is taking place in Dundee. This lecture accompanies the Masters of Design Exhibition which showcases the work of my project.

Modern design has run its course. The challenges of our age demands a new design; in place of designing for desire we should design for inclusion, understanding and real world problem solving. The power of design thinking presents us with new opportunities for the future.

As Scotland's top rated institution for research design, the University of Dundee is uniquely placed to set out a new vision for the future of design. In this special lecture, Professors Tom Inns and Mike Press - both internationally acknowledged writers, researchers and broadcasters on design - provide a provocative and visionary of design in the 21st Century.

Evidence of this new design is seen in the work of this year's graduating Masters of Design students. The lecture accompanies their masters exhibition, providing vital contexts and insights into their work. Together, the lecture and exhibition emphasise Dundee's unique approach to the research and practice of design.

Tickets are available from University Online store and the Tower Building Reception.

Professor Mike Press is a fantastic speaker and has been a strong inspiration throughout my MDes year. Mike and I were part of the T3 team!

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Professor Tom Inns has been my project mentor this year and has been a major influence - I am really inspired by the way Tom makes sense of complexity through metaphors and language!

Picture 6

This should not be missed!