design education

5 New Design Careers and Top 10 Skills

Tim Brown is the CEO and president of IDEO. He has written a post that seems like the perfect follow up from my previous post on how to get a job as a service designer. Tim has shared five new design careers for the 21st century and he encourages us to ask ourselves How might I apply my unique talents to design challenges? and what other unlikely skill sets do you think could advance design innovation?  

"Fancy a career in design? When I made that choice 30 years ago, the options were limited. You either got an engineering degree and then went to design school, or you went to art school and studied graphic design, architecture, or industrial design, like I did.

Today, things are very different. Thanks to the still-booming Silicon Valley, interaction and user-experience designers have been added to the mix, but those aren’t the only opportunities for design thinkers. Even graduates of non-traditional programs can embark on exciting design careers. To wit, here are five disciplines that didn’t even exist at IDEO a few years ago.

The Designer Coder

Prototyping has always been a critical part of design, but in today’s online, app-based economy, the preferred prototyping medium is increasingly code. Designers who can also code possess a powerful set of tools. There are thousands of positions open to those who have the skills to conceive new ideas and the ability to launch them quickly into market.

The Design Entrepreneur

Combining entrepreneurialism and design is the hot thing in Silicon Valley these days. Every start-up worth its salt has a designer on its founding team. Venture capital firms are including designers in their inner circles, too. More importantly, many of the fastest-growing companies are succeeding because they’ve designed a highly appealing product or service. Just look at Uber or Airbnb. If you have the design skills to craft the right product—and the entrepreneurial grit to see things through—there’s never been a better time to be a design entrepreneur.

The Hybrid Design Researcher

Once upon a time, design researchers came from backgrounds in anthropology, ethnography, or psychology. Deep qualitative research was the secret to discovering unmet needs. While it’s still a successful design-research strategy, these more traditional methods are now being combined with real-time data to reveal user behavior. Knowing how to tap into technology to uncover how individuals and groups really think and act is an essential part of innovation. If you love people and love crunching data, this might be the design career for you.

The Business Designer

Business design may seem like a contradiction if you think about business purely from an operational lens. If you’re a business designer, however, you’re not just looking for innovation from an end product or service. You’re looking at the business model, channel strategy, marketing, supply chain, and a million other things. In truly disruptive innovations, all aspects of the business are up for grabs. Think about the early days of Google. Search innovation was what we experienced as users, but it was by attaching search results to advertising—a business model innovation—that made the company billions. If you have a passion for operations and a desire to flex your creative muscles to create new business systems, then becoming a business designer is the way to go.

The Social Innovator

Creating maximum positive impact on the planet has been my main motivation as a designer. Today, many of those problems—poverty alleviation, access to clean water, financial inclusion, health services for the poor, livable cities, and many more—are in the social sector. Until recently, the only way designers could contribute to these issues was to do small, pro-bono projects or to do research stints within academia. But now, large organization such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, and others, have enthusiastically embraced design thinking. At the same time, non-profit design companies like D-Rev, Design that Matters, our own IDEO.org, and others are collaborating with social entrepreneurs and NGOs to bring exciting new innovations to those most in need. For perhaps the first time in the history of design, it’s possible to make a career designing for the social sector.

These are just a handful of exciting new design careers I’ve witnessed as of late. Given the urgent, complex challenges our world faces, expect more. Better yet, if you’re a young graduate or looking to change careers, ask yourself:

How might I apply my unique talents to design challenges?

Who knows, maybe next year, I might be writing about you.

What other unlikely skill sets do you think could advance design innovation?

 

And how do these connect to the 10 most important work skills in 2020 ... ( via Indy Johar )

Important Work Skills for 2020 Source: Top10OnlineColleges.org

5 New Design Careers and Top 10 Skills

Tim Brown is the CEO and president of IDEO. He has written a post that seems like the perfect follow up from my previous post on how to get a job as a service designer. Tim has shared five new design careers for the 21st century and he encourages us to ask ourselves How might I apply my unique talents to design challenges? and what other unlikely skill sets do you think could advance design innovation?  

"Fancy a career in design? When I made that choice 30 years ago, the options were limited. You either got an engineering degree and then went to design school, or you went to art school and studied graphic design, architecture, or industrial design, like I did.

Today, things are very different. Thanks to the still-booming Silicon Valley, interaction and user-experience designers have been added to the mix, but those aren’t the only opportunities for design thinkers. Even graduates of non-traditional programs can embark on exciting design careers. To wit, here are five disciplines that didn’t even exist at IDEO a few years ago.

The Designer Coder

Prototyping has always been a critical part of design, but in today’s online, app-based economy, the preferred prototyping medium is increasingly code. Designers who can also code possess a powerful set of tools. There are thousands of positions open to those who have the skills to conceive new ideas and the ability to launch them quickly into market.

The Design Entrepreneur

Combining entrepreneurialism and design is the hot thing in Silicon Valley these days. Every start-up worth its salt has a designer on its founding team. Venture capital firms are including designers in their inner circles, too. More importantly, many of the fastest-growing companies are succeeding because they’ve designed a highly appealing product or service. Just look at Uber or Airbnb. If you have the design skills to craft the right product—and the entrepreneurial grit to see things through—there’s never been a better time to be a design entrepreneur.

The Hybrid Design Researcher

Once upon a time, design researchers came from backgrounds in anthropology, ethnography, or psychology. Deep qualitative research was the secret to discovering unmet needs. While it’s still a successful design-research strategy, these more traditional methods are now being combined with real-time data to reveal user behavior. Knowing how to tap into technology to uncover how individuals and groups really think and act is an essential part of innovation. If you love people and love crunching data, this might be the design career for you.

The Business Designer

Business design may seem like a contradiction if you think about business purely from an operational lens. If you’re a business designer, however, you’re not just looking for innovation from an end product or service. You’re looking at the business model, channel strategy, marketing, supply chain, and a million other things. In truly disruptive innovations, all aspects of the business are up for grabs. Think about the early days of Google. Search innovation was what we experienced as users, but it was by attaching search results to advertising—a business model innovation—that made the company billions. If you have a passion for operations and a desire to flex your creative muscles to create new business systems, then becoming a business designer is the way to go.

The Social Innovator

Creating maximum positive impact on the planet has been my main motivation as a designer. Today, many of those problems—poverty alleviation, access to clean water, financial inclusion, health services for the poor, livable cities, and many more—are in the social sector. Until recently, the only way designers could contribute to these issues was to do small, pro-bono projects or to do research stints within academia. But now, large organization such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, and others, have enthusiastically embraced design thinking. At the same time, non-profit design companies like D-Rev, Design that Matters, our own IDEO.org, and others are collaborating with social entrepreneurs and NGOs to bring exciting new innovations to those most in need. For perhaps the first time in the history of design, it’s possible to make a career designing for the social sector.

These are just a handful of exciting new design careers I’ve witnessed as of late. Given the urgent, complex challenges our world faces, expect more. Better yet, if you’re a young graduate or looking to change careers, ask yourself:

How might I apply my unique talents to design challenges?

Who knows, maybe next year, I might be writing about you.

What other unlikely skill sets do you think could advance design innovation?

 

And how do these connect to the 10 most important work skills in 2020 ... ( via Indy Johar )

Important Work Skills for 2020 Source: Top10OnlineColleges.org

Master in Service Design 2011 Competition

The Domus Academy have launched a service design competition to win a scholarship for their new Masters Course In Service Design.

The new master in Service Design is devoted to create the next generation of humanized and pleasurable service experiences. The design-driven approach to Service Design and management and the human-centric view are the driving forces for the innovation of service industries.

So you can enter this competition and send your service idea proposal to get a scholarship!

Volcanic Ash Cloud Shuts Airports:

The inconvenience generated by unpredictable events can become an occasion for companies to offer service plus.

Due to the ash cloud, in the last months, most people experienced canceled flights and flight's delay during their traveling time, with all the related soft or serious damages : waiting at the airport for hours or days, being forced to stay longer in a city-hotel, getting fresh clothes, feeling anxiety in flying close to the ash cloud, loosing important family or business events, queuing to find alternative travel arrangements and get information on next flights or trains, working in any place without your own stuff.

Consider one of these possibilities inconvenient situations to design a service idea that companies such as Airports, Airlines, Hotels, Travel Agencies, or even Telecoms could offer to their clients to alleviate the problems encountered. Often simple ideas and signals of courtesy become distinctive and value for customers.

The deadline is the 6th September...do you want to study Service Design in Italy? I think this is a great opportunity - and what do you have to lose? if you don't win you have still answered a very relevant brief! Let me know if you are going to enter ...

Studio Unbound II

There has been chatter on twitter about Studio Unbound II, which is happening at Glasgow School of Art tonight. studiounbound_card1sq

For those of you who are new to this initiative you can watch the first Studio Unbound that happened in February at The University of Dundee.

Founded in 2009 by University of Dundee Master of Design graduate Lauren Currie (@Redjotter), and design writer and consultant Kate Andrews (@kateandrews), the Studio Unbound is an initiative aiming to introduce students, graduates and educators to the creative power of social media.

Together as Studio Unbound, Kate and Lauren explore the power of digital networking, demonstrating tools that students can use to move ideas forward, form networks with practitioners around the world, and build a reputation before and after graduation.

In highlighting creative people all over the world using social networking to their advantage, Studio Unbound discuss the dynamic, conversational value of new communication technologies and illustrate how ideas of teaching and learning need to move away from the confines of the classroom or studio towards other, often ad-hoc and virtual venues.

Focusing on the ever growing possibilities and opportunities that the digital world presents, Studio Unbound demonstrate that during a time of mass communication change, design courses must change with it if they are to stay relevant.

Studio Unbound is not all about Twitter or Facebook, but about breaking down preconceptions of social media technologies, into an incredible value system that can enable us all to find both an individual voice, and collaborative practice.

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“A great designer understands that search and discovery is an on-going process that is at the heart of what makes us human. We spend our lives searching for people we share a strong sense of connection with. Designers must join that search.” - Desiree Collier, 2009. Design Week. The Joy of Search.

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Joining Studio Unbound since October 2009, is Social Innovation Camp winner Sarah Drummond (@rufflemuffin). On October 8th 2009, Lauren and Sarah will run a Studio Unbound lecture at Glasgow School of Art, with Kate joining from London via Skype.

Join the conversation on twitter #studiounbound

Join our facebook group and keep an eye on our blog which is still in the making but looking promising... :)

Kate Pickering, a forward thinking jeweller will be tweeting from the audience tonight - join in on twitter with the tag #studiounbound and follow us live!

See you tonight at 6pm, Bourdon Lecture Theatre...

THE END OF DESIGN

The End of Design was the public lecture accompanying my recent Masters Exhibition. [slideshare id=2131578&doc=theendofdesign-091005111752-phpapp01]

"Modern design has run its course. The challenges of our age demands a new design; in place of designing for desire we should design for inclusion, understanding and real world problem solving. The power of design thinking presents us with new opportunities for the future.

As Scotland's top rated institution for research design, the University of Dundee is uniquely placed to set out a new vision for the future of design. In this special lecture, Professors Tom Inns and Mike Press - both internationally acknowledged writers, researchers and broadcasters on design - provide a provocative and visionary of design in the 21st Century.

Evidence of this new design is seen in the work of this year's graduating Masters of Design students. The lecture accompanies their masters exhibition, providing vital contexts and insights into their work. Together, the lecture and exhibition emphasise Dundee's unique approach to the research and practice of design. "

Lasting around an hour this video is a deep insight into The Master of Design Course at Dundee and the work at our Masters exhibition. It is definitely one to watch for the students who have gotten in touch with me as they are considering applying for the course - and other Masters students who are embarking upon a design journey.

It should not be missed - design against crime | service design | co design | social design | transformation design | product design | interaction design | design for well being | design for disability | design thinking | design management | interdisciplinary...the list goes on....

[vodpod id=ExternalVideo.880125&w=425&h=350&fv=clip_id%3D6909549%26server%3Dvimeo.com%26autoplay%3D0%26fullscreen%3D1%26md5%3D0%26show_portrait%3D0%26show_title%3D0%26show_byline%3D0%26context%3Duser%3A1168321%26context_id%3D%26force_embed%3D0%26multimoog%3D%26color%3D00ADEF%26force_info%3Dundefined]

more about "THE END OF DESIGN on Vimeo", posted with vodpod

Tom, who was my project mentor, recently shared his archipelago of design at a workshop in London. Lauren Tan documented the day really well, in particular her insights from Toms model.