Lauren Currie

Learning Lab with UsTwo

Learning Labs are Hyper Island’s way of bringing together a new group of people to meet Hyper Island, meet industry, and share and learn together. Lawrence Kitson from UsTwo has been heavily involved in the design of the new Digital Experience Design MA and I teamed up with him to design a Learning Lab that we hoped would inspire and teach the attendees something new.

Digitial_Experience_Design

In the beautiful Hoxton Hotel in London, we welcomed 40 folks to spend a couple of hours with us to listen, learn and do. The group was made up of graduates, students, designers and developers from design, UX, marketing and advertising agencies. As well as some lovely Snook and Hyper Island alumni.

Digital_Experience_Design

The night began with an introduction to Hyper Island, we talked about where, why and how it all began as well as how we work and why we work the way we do. I shared Snook’s story and talked about projects like The Matter, Know Sugar and Cycle Hack.

Digital_Experience_Design
Digital_Experience_Design

Lawrence talked about UsTwo and let us see inside their business model, their culture and their projects - brilliant stuff.

Digital_Experience_Design

We set the group a challenge to redesign a broken service and introduced them to two core service design tools: journey mapping and prototyping. The teams came up with a diverse range of experiences to improve:

Reporting a stolen bike
All inclusive holidays
Train delays
NHS test results
Booking an appointment with your GP

Personal ID cards

Digital_Experience_Design

They then brainstormed solutions and prototyped their ideas. I talked about the new programme, shared the principles behind it and details on the course content. You can find out more about that here.

We ended the evening with a “check out”. This is a core methodology we use at Hyper Island to mentally connect with each other and the experience we’ve just had. The energy in the room was amazing and we all left with big smiles on our faces.

A snapshot of some of the check outs:

"I wish my work was going to feel like this tomorrow” “I feel enlightened and inspired” “When’s the next one?” “I feel hopeful about the future again”

Thank you to everyone who came for your energy, curiosity and laughter. If you’d like to get together to host a Learning Lab at your business, school or place of work drop me a line.

Digital_Experience_Design
Digital_Experience_Design

 

Learning Lab with UsTwo

Learning Labs are Hyper Island’s way of bringing together a new group of people to meet Hyper Island, meet industry, and share and learn together. Lawrence Kitson from UsTwo has been heavily involved in the design of the new Digital Experience Design MA and I teamed up with him to design a Learning Lab that we hoped would inspire and teach the attendees something new.

Digitial_Experience_Design

In the beautiful Hoxton Hotel in London, we welcomed 40 folks to spend a couple of hours with us to listen, learn and do. The group was made up of graduates, students, designers and developers from design, UX, marketing and advertising agencies. As well as some lovely Snook and Hyper Island alumni.

Digital_Experience_Design

The night began with an introduction to Hyper Island, we talked about where, why and how it all began as well as how we work and why we work the way we do. I shared Snook’s story and talked about projects like The Matter, Know Sugar and Cycle Hack.

Digital_Experience_Design
Digital_Experience_Design

Lawrence talked about UsTwo and let us see inside their business model, their culture and their projects - brilliant stuff.

Digital_Experience_Design

We set the group a challenge to redesign a broken service and introduced them to two core service design tools: journey mapping and prototyping. The teams came up with a diverse range of experiences to improve:

Reporting a stolen bike
All inclusive holidays
Train delays
NHS test results
Booking an appointment with your GP

Personal ID cards

Digital_Experience_Design

They then brainstormed solutions and prototyped their ideas. I talked about the new programme, shared the principles behind it and details on the course content. You can find out more about that here.

We ended the evening with a “check out”. This is a core methodology we use at Hyper Island to mentally connect with each other and the experience we’ve just had. The energy in the room was amazing and we all left with big smiles on our faces.

A snapshot of some of the check outs:

"I wish my work was going to feel like this tomorrow” “I feel enlightened and inspired” “When’s the next one?” “I feel hopeful about the future again”

Thank you to everyone who came for your energy, curiosity and laughter. If you’d like to get together to host a Learning Lab at your business, school or place of work drop me a line.

Digital_Experience_Design
Digital_Experience_Design

 

An interview with Service Design Hub

Yesterday I had the absolute pleasure of being interviewed by the lovely Suze Ingram ; a user-experience designer, founder of Service Design Hub in Australia and a big thinker.

You can find out more about the hub and follow Suze on twitter. Yet another inspiring conversation with someone who is sowing the seeds of service design in their own country where it is still unknown and unfamiliar.

Thank you Suze for a great conversation and I am sending you smiles from one side of the world to the other.

being a patient

I am obsessed with service, to borrow a phrase from Richard I think I am as close as it gets to being a service junkie. This means that  I spend my days devouring every tweet, article and policy about the health service, patient experience and the role design can play in that. In the early hours of Thursday morning I woke up with unbearable pains in my stomach. To cut a long story short, I phoned the NHS 24 hour help line twice, on the second phone call they referred me to the out of hours GP, who then referred me to casualty who then took me to a ward.  They kept me in for two nights and I had an ultra sound scan, blood tests, all kinds of other bodily tests ( ! ) and the conclusion is they think I had an infection in my appendix that has sorted itself out.

I have never been a patient before so there were many things that I noticed, appreciated, felt could be better, even when poorly those " design lenses " picked up detail and feeling.

It was the absence of communication that increased my anxiety. The taxi driver drove us to the hospital in silence - which made me think of Barry Schwartz's talk on our loss of wisdom and the way he describes the role of a hospital janitor. I've just moved into a new flat and had no idea where we were, if he had let me know we were only five minutes away it would have made the journey a little easier.

When I arrived I was asked to put a gown on, and my first instinct was why? Then being moved to the surgical ward, my first thought was does this mean I am going to have surgery.

And at shower time... where was I meant to go? are there towels and shampoo in there? well I didn't want to ask, what if they thought I was treating the place like a hotel! Alice, in the bed next to me filled me in , there is only hair mousse ( or moss as she called it ) so I asked another long haired lady for some shampoo ... the nurse gave me a towel.

Walking in to all these things for the first time, in pain, in a strange place, was the time I needed that extra bit of reassurance. I'm sure when you work in this environment all of the time you can take for granted the normality of it, and also the pressures of being emotionally attentive to people must be tough. But an explanation of the simple things between each new experience would have made a difference.

After those first few hours though, and into the rest of Thursday, Friday and Saturday, I was able to immerse myself more in to the ward. My bed was straight across from the desk so I could eavesdrop and watch all the goings on.

The staff seem like best friends, constant winks and giggles brought sunshine into the ward and I knew they were happy to be there. They come to work every day and genuinely laugh out loud, I don't think there are many people who are lucky enough to feel that way at their work.

The last experience I had with the NHS in Stoke Mandeville Hospital was horrific and inspired me to write an article on why the NHS needs service design. This experience was totally different and has inspired me to make a thank you card for all the staff in ward 16!

The NHS help line was particularly good and they helped me so much. Simple things like reassuring me they would call me back if our line got cut off and telling me they would make sure I got the attention I needed.

It's all about people, from how we communicate to how we smile. The staff in ward 16 are faced with people who are bored, stubborn, tired and anxious. Yet they see past that and go out their way to make sure you are comfortable and as at ease as you can be. The doctors really explained what was happening to my body and why and the nurses really cared. You can't buy that, or teach it. That's what I call true service.

Berlin Beckons

The  Service Design Network Conference Agenda was released this week. I went along to their first event in Amsterdam, November 2008, I couldn't afford a ticket on my student budget so I asked my university to buy me a ticket instead of paying me for the teaching I was doing at the time. Like many others I decided not to go to the event in 2009 primarily because its location, but it did spark a huge debate amongst the community about what the next conference should be!

So, here we are in 2010 with the "next conference "only months away! I'm feeling pretty proud of myself because I have been invited to be a keynote speaker on the second day and my partner in crime, Sarah is lecturing on the first day. I am also initiating a design challenge around Making Service Sense. A hat trick for the Snook team !

I can't wait to meet new people and put many faces to twitter names! This opportunity has really got me thinking, I want to make an impact. I re-read the post I wrote about the event in 2008 and the journey I have been on since then has been pretty incredible.

I can't wait to share it with you.